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In the news today, Oct. 11

Last Updated Oct 11, 2018 at 5:40 am MST

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talks with Armenian Foreign Minister Zohrab Mnatsakanyan as he is greeted upon his arrival in Yerevan, Armenia on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, to attend la Francophonie summit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Four stories in the news for Thursday, Oct. 11

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MICHAELLE JEAN CONTINUES BID FOR FRANCOPHONIE POST

Former governor general Michaelle Jean and delegations from Canada and Quebec are in Armenia today for summit of la Francophonie. Jean, who has been secretary general of the organization of French-speaking nations since 2014, showed no signs of abandoning her candidacy despite losing the support of her home country and province. She is seeking a second term and will be up against Rwandan Foreign Affairs Minister Louise Mushikiwabo when members make their choice this week. The Canadian and Quebec governments announced earlier this week they were withdrawing support for Jean’s bid to remain in the job, backing instead the “consensus” candidate, Mushikiwabo.

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FRANK STRONACH SUES DAUGHTER OVER FAMILY FORTUNE

An Ontario business magnate is suing his daughter, two grandchildren and others for allegedly mismanaging the family’s assets and trust funds. Frank Stronach, the man who started the autoparts business Magna International, and his wife, Elfriede, have launched the lawsuit in Ontario Superior Court and say they have done so as a last resort. Thoroughbred Daily News reports the couple have accused Belinda Stronach, the chairman and president of The Stronach Group that runs horse racetracks around the world, of conspiring by “unlawful actions” against the best interests of other members of the Stronach family. The suit, which has not been proven in court, seeks more than $500 million in damages.

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SEEK SECTORAL TRADE WITH CHINA: REPORT

Dozens of experts are urging Canada to choose a surgical, sector-by-sector approach when it comes to expanding its trading relationship with China rather than a sweeping free trade deal that could risk provoking the United States, says a new report. The Public Policy Forum paper, to be released today, lays out a suggested blueprint for Canadian policy-makers at a time when Ottawa has struggled in its efforts to deepen business ties with the Asian superpower. The study will also arrive after Canada recently agreed to a free trade pact with the U.S. and Mexico, a deal that includes a controversial new clause requiring the countries to notify each other if they enter into trade talks with a “non-market” economy. The clause makes no specific mention of China, but the provision is being widely viewed as an attempt by Washington to single out Beijing.

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CLUB BANS REPORTERS FROM HARPER BOOK EVENT

The news media has been uninvited to a speech by Stephen Harper today, underscoring the apparent antipathy the former prime minister continues to harbour in private life toward the Canadian press corps. Harper is to address the Canadian Club of Toronto, which had previously invited reporters to cover the event. But the club sent out a notice to the media Wednesday saying the invitation had been sent in error. Harper is plugging a new book, “Right Here, Right Now,” in which he addresses how conservatives should tackle the challenge of rising populism since the election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency.

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